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New GMAT Section in June 2012: Integrated Reasoning

So the guys over at GMAC are adding a new section to the GMAT!

We’ve been getting lots of questions and requests from you regarding preparation for the

It’s called integrated reasoning and is basically a combination of Critical Reasoning + MBA level math. You’ll be asked to interpret charts and data sets. So stats, probability, and data analysis will be tested.


I actually think this is a good thing—it’s a lot more accurate to test these skills for an MBA program than it is to test triangles and circles. Interpreting tables of data is something that MBAs/management consultants/investment bankers do a lot–so why NOT test this skill in the GMAT?

I feel testing probability and statistics in the context of theory is pointless. The new integrated reasoning section will be testing these same concepts but in a much more relevant context. It’s actually more realistic and that’s why they’re doing it.

Q: How does Integrated Reasoning affect your 800 score?

GMAT Pill: It doesn’t. You actually get a completely separate score for it – similar to the way you get a separate AWA score.

So your score transcript will show your 800 score, your AWA score, and your IR score.

Q: Will there be a calculator for the integrated reasoning section?

GMATPill: Yes. Unlike the quant section of the existing GMAT section, the integrated reasoning section will involve “weird” math.
I say weird, because you’ll be using a lot more realistic numbers. Rather than seeing nice round numbers, or nice decimals, you’l actually see things like

.738 billion

And you might have to divide that by 1.25%

On the regular Quant section, you wouldn’t see weird numbers like this. But the purpose of the IR section is to be more “real-world” realistic in terms of the numbers you’d actually use in business and in business school. So yes, you’ll see these kinds of numbers and may very well need to use the on-screen calculator.

Q: How much longer will the exam be?

Actually it’s going to be the same amount of time. But it’s going to take the place of the 2nd AWA essay. So total time of the exam is still the same. However, it’s going to be a lot more grueling because the amount of thinking involved to sort data, do calculatins, and think critically on the IR section will be a lot more than the amount of thinking that you would have done for just a simple essay.

GMATPill has created solutions to sample Integrated Reasoning questions from GMAC for their new GMAT exam.


Watch New GMAT Integrated Reasoning Video Solutions

There are 4 types of Integrated Reasoning Questions

Type #1: Graphics Interpretation – Here you’re given some kind of graph. It could be a bar chart, an XY scatter plot graph, or pie graph, or a Venn diagram. Your job is to interpret the graph and answer the question.

Type #2: Two-Part Analysis – This usually asks you two questions that both have the same selection pool of available answer choices. The first question is in the first column and the second question is in the second column.

Type #3: Table Analysis – This involves interpreting a table of information. You might have a rows of data with a number of columns. You will have the ability to sort columns to help you sort through the pile of data. You will be asked a true or false question and you must answer yes or no for this integrated reasoning question.

Type #4: Multi-Source Reasoning – This one involves multiple tabs of information. Usually the first question will correspond with the first tab and the second question will correspond with the second tab and so on. All tabs will be related in some way.

For more information, check out GMATPill’s solution to the New GMAT Integrated Reasoning Questions released by GMAC.

Just take a look at the video below. Notice there are data sets categorizing data in terms of country, % change, Rank, etc, in the context of airport data.

More info from the GMAC folks directly.
What does the GMAT prep market look like?

 

So the guys over at GMAC are adding a new section to the GMAT!

We’ve been getting lots of questions and requests from you regarding preparation for the GMAT Integrated Reasoning section – which is now in full effect as of June 5, 2012.

When will GMAT Pill Release The Integrated Reasoning Pill?

Here’s the tentative release schedule for the Integrated Reasoning Pill:

Part 1: Two-Part Analysis (May 15, 2012) Update: Launched!
Part 2: Graphics Interpretation Update: Launched!
Part 3: Table Analysis Questions Update: Launched!
Part 4: Multi-Source Reasoning Questions Update: Launched!
Part 5: Table Analysis Video Explanations Update: Launched!
Part 6: Multi-Source Video Explanations (before July 1)

You can also practice GMAT integrated reasoning questions here.

It’s called integrated reasoning and is basically a combination of all the other sections including Critical Reasoning + MBA level math. You’ll be asked to interpret charts and data sets. So stats, probability, data analysis, reading and interpreting paragraphs will be tested.


What will be on the Graphics Interpretation section?


As the video shows, you’ll see bar charts, line graphs, pie graphs, scatterplots with regression lines, bubble charts, clustered bar graphs, stock charts, etc.

What do I need to know about the new GMAT Integrated Reasoning Section?

Watch this 16:11 min video to get an overview of what it’s all about.


Yes – it “integrates” everything. Even elements of data sufficiency are in there!


I actually think this is a good thing—it’s a lot more accurate to test these skills for an MBA program than it is to test triangles and circles. Interpreting tables of data is something that MBAs/management consultants/investment bankers do a lot–so why NOT test this skill in the GMAT?

I feel testing probability and statistics in the context of theory is pointless. The new integrated reasoning section will be testing these same concepts but in a much more relevant context. It’s actually more realistic and that’s why they’re doing it.

Q: How does Integrated Reasoning affect your 800 score?

GMAT Pill: It doesn’t. You actually get a completely separate score for it – similar to the way you get a separate AWA score.

So your score transcript will show your 800 score, your AWA score, and your IR score.

You can read more about Integrated Reasoning scoring here.

Q: Will there be a calculator for the integrated reasoning section?

GMATPill: Yes. Unlike the quant section of the existing GMAT section, the integrated reasoning section will involve “weird” math.
I say weird, because you’ll be using a lot more realistic numbers. Rather than seeing nice round numbers, or nice decimals, you’l actually see things like

.738 billion

And you might have to divide that by 1.25%

On the regular Quant section, you wouldn’t see weird numbers like this. But the purpose of the IR section is to be more “real-world” realistic in terms of the numbers you’d actually use in business and in business school. So yes, you’ll see these kinds of numbers and may very well need to use the on-screen calculator.

Q: How much longer will the exam be?

Actually it’s going to be the same amount of time. But it’s going to take the place of the 2nd AWA essay. So total time of the exam is still the same. However, it’s going to be a lot more grueling because the amount of thinking involved to sort data, do calculatins, and think critically on the IR section will be a lot more than the amount of thinking that you would have done for just a simple essay.

GMATPill has created solutions to sample Integrated Reasoning questions from GMAC for their new GMAT exam.


Watch New GMAT Integrated Reasoning Video Solutions

There are 4 types of Integrated Reasoning Questions

12 IR questions will be auto-generated for the exam. The approximate types of questions you’ll see (again, depending on how the algorithm calculates and the level of difficulty of questions selected) will be ~4 Two-Part Analysis, ~3 Graphics Interpretation, ~2 Table Analysis, and ~3 Multisource Reasoning questions.

Type #1: Graphics Interpretation – Here you’re given some kind of graph. It could be a bar chart, an XY scatter plot graph, or pie graph, or a Venn diagram. Your job is to interpret the graph and answer the question.

Now of the 12 integrated reasoning questions you get in the 30 minutes, ~3 of those 12 will be graphical interpretation questions. Each of those 3 questions will be formatted in the same way.

You’ll be given a diagram/graphic and your question will be formatted in the form of a drop down question. There will be two (2) statements and each statement will have a dropdown where you will have to select the appropriate option that best fills in that sentence.

Here’s what it looks like:

Type #2: Two-Part Analysis – This usually asks you two questions that both have the same selection pool of available answer choices. The first question is in the first column and the second question is in the second column.

Out of the 12 integrated reasoning questions you ‘ll see in those 30 minutes you get for this section, ~4 of them will be two part analysis questions. That’s the most out of these ~4 types of questions. All four of these two-part analysis questions will ask you to choose 1 answer for each of the 2 COLUMNS.

It looks like this:

Note this “two-part” format differs from the confusingly similar “this/that” question format, which you’l find in the Table Analysis and Multi-Source questions described below.

Type #3: Table Analysis – This involves interpreting a table of information. You might have a rows of data with a number of columns. You will have the ability to sort columns to help you sort through the pile of data. You will be asked a true or false question and you must answer yes or no for this integrated reasoning question.

Of the 12 integrated reasoning questions you’ll see, ~2 of them will be table analysis questions. Both of these ~2 questions will be in the “this/that” question format. Your job will be to choose Yes/No or True/False for each of the answer choices provided. Most of the time, you will see ~3 rows of answer choices – so you will need to pick 3 answers corresponding to the 2 options for each of those 3 answers. Here’s what it looks like:

Note the “This/That” format is similar but not the same as the “two-part” format mentioned above for the Two Part Analysis questions. Don’t worry, you’ll get the hang of it through the GMAT Pill videos.
Type #4: Multi-Source Reasoning – This one involves multiple tabs of information. Usually the first question will correspond with the first tab and the second question will correspond with the second tab and so on. All tabs will be related in some way.

Of the 12 integrated reasoning questions that you get 30 minutes to do, ~3 of them will be multi-source questions (MSR for short). ~2 of the 3 questions will be formatted in the “This/That” format that we talked about earlier in the Table Analysis section.

Again, here’s what it looks like:
And the remaining ~1 question will be in the traditional multiple choice format.

———————————–

Some additional points to note about the GMAT Integrated Reasononing section

1) So those are the 12 questions broken down into the 4 types of questions. You’ll have 30 minutes to complete – that’s an average of 2 minutes and 30 seconds per question.

2) Note the integrated reasoning section will be near the BEGINNING of your exam — right after the 1st essay, but before the Quant and Verbal sections which are responsible for your overall 800 score.

3) You cannot go backwards on the test.

4) The order in which you see the different types of question types is completely random. That means you might sometimes get a two-part analysis question first. Sometimes you might see multi-source, etc.. Don’t try to guess which question type you’ll get first. But do note that ~4 of the 12 integrated reasoning questions will be two-part analysis questions – so expect to see them more often.

5) In terms of scoring, the number of correct responses that count (meaning we exclude the 2-4 experimental questions) out of total # of questions that count will be scaled to get your raw score out of 8. The scaling factor will be based on 1) # of questions you received that actually count and 2) total difficulty level of all questions you received. So, it’s not as simple as “getting 8/12 questions correct translates to an IR score of 6”. Another person taking the exam can get 8 correct and get an IR score of 7. Click here for more details and examples on integrated reasoning scoring.

6) In the 30 minutes you get for the 12 questions, there is no partial credit. Budget 2 minutes and 30 seconds on average for each question. Note each “question” actually consists of 2-3 mini questions. There is NO partial credit for those mini questions.

You can read more about integrated reasoning scoring here.

For more information, check out GMATPill’s solution to the New GMAT Integrated Reasoning Questions released by GMAC.

Some of you may have heard about new changes in the Sentence Correction (SC) section related to idioms phasing out and a greater focus on meaning. You can read more about this development and what it means for your GMAT preparation needs here.

Just take a look at the video below. Notice there are data sets categorizing data in terms of country, % change, Rank, etc, in the context of airport data.

More info from the GMAC folks directly.
What does the GMAT prep market look like?

 

So the guys over at GMAC are adding a new section to the GMAT!

We’ve been getting lots of questions and requests from you regarding preparation for the GMAT Integrated Reasoning section – which will be in full effect on June 5, 2012.

It’s called integrated reasoning and is basically a combination of Critical Reasoning + MBA level math. You’ll be asked to interpret charts and data sets. So stats, probability, and data analysis will be tested.


I actually think this is a good thing—it’s a lot more accurate to test these skills for an MBA program than it is to test triangles and circles. Interpreting tables of data is something that MBAs/management consultants/investment bankers do a lot–so why NOT test this skill in the GMAT?

I feel testing probability and statistics in the context of theory is pointless. The new integrated reasoning section will be testing these same concepts but in a much more relevant context. It’s actually more realistic and that’s why they’re doing it.

Q: How does Integrated Reasoning affect your 800 score?

GMAT Pill: It doesn’t. You actually get a completely separate score for it – similar to the way you get a separate AWA score.

So your score transcript will show your 800 score, your AWA score, and your IR score.

Q: Will there be a calculator for the integrated reasoning section?

GMATPill: Yes. Unlike the quant section of the existing GMAT section, the integrated reasoning section will involve “weird” math.
I say weird, because you’ll be using a lot more realistic numbers. Rather than seeing nice round numbers, or nice decimals, you’l actually see things like

.738 billion

And you might have to divide that by 1.25%

On the regular Quant section, you wouldn’t see weird numbers like this. But the purpose of the IR section is to be more “real-world” realistic in terms of the numbers you’d actually use in business and in business school. So yes, you’ll see these kinds of numbers and may very well need to use the on-screen calculator.

Q: How much longer will the exam be?

Actually it’s going to be the same amount of time. But it’s going to take the place of the 2nd AWA essay. So total time of the exam is still the same. However, it’s going to be a lot more grueling because the amount of thinking involved to sort data, do calculatins, and think critically on the IR section will be a lot more than the amount of thinking that you would have done for just a simple essay.

GMATPill has created solutions to sample Integrated Reasoning questions from GMAC for their new GMAT exam.


Watch New GMAT Integrated Reasoning Video Solutions

There are 4 types of Integrated Reasoning Questions

Type #1: Graphics Interpretation – Here you’re given some kind of graph. It could be a bar chart, an XY scatter plot graph, or pie graph, or a Venn diagram. Your job is to interpret the graph and answer the question.

Type #2: Two-Part Analysis – This usually asks you two questions that both have the same selection pool of available answer choices. The first question is in the first column and the second question is in the second column.

Type #3: Table Analysis – This involves interpreting a table of information. You might have a rows of data with a number of columns. You will have the ability to sort columns to help you sort through the pile of data. You will be asked a true or false question and you must answer yes or no for this integrated reasoning question.

Type #4: Multi-Source Reasoning – This one involves multiple tabs of information. Usually the first question will correspond with the first tab and the second question will correspond with the second tab and so on. All tabs will be related in some way.

For more information, check out GMATPill’s solution to the New GMAT Integrated Reasoning Questions released by GMAC.

Just take a look at the video below. Notice there are data sets categorizing data in terms of country, % change, Rank, etc, in the context of airport data.

More info from the GMAC folks directly.
What does the GMAT prep market look like?

So the guys over at GMAC are adding a new section to the GMAT!

We’ve been getting lots of questions and requests from you regarding preparation for the GMAT Integrated Reasoning section – which is now in full effect as of June 5, 2012.

When will GMAT Pill Release The Integrated Reasoning Pill?

Here’s the tentative release schedule for the Integrated Reasoning Pill:

Part 1: Two-Part Analysis (May 15, 2012) Update: Launched!
Part 2: Graphics Interpretation Update: Launched!
Part 3: Table Analysis Questions Update: Launched!
Part 4: Multi-Source Reasoning Questions Update: Launched!
Part 5: Table Analysis Video Explanations Update: Launched!
Part 6: Multi-Source Video Explanations Update: Launched!

You can also practice GMAT integrated reasoning questions here.

It’s called integrated reasoning and is basically a combination of all the other sections including Critical Reasoning + MBA level math. You’ll be asked to interpret charts and data sets. So stats, probability, data analysis, reading and interpreting paragraphs will be tested.


What will be on the Graphics Interpretation section?


As the video shows, you’ll see bar charts, line graphs, pie graphs, scatterplots with regression lines, bubble charts, clustered bar graphs, stock charts, etc.

What do I need to know about the new GMAT Integrated Reasoning Section?

Watch this 16:11 min video to get an overview of what it’s all about.


Yes – it “integrates” everything. Even elements of data sufficiency are in there!


I actually think this is a good thing—it’s a lot more accurate to test these skills for an MBA program than it is to test triangles and circles. Interpreting tables of data is something that MBAs/management consultants/investment bankers do a lot–so why NOT test this skill in the GMAT?

I feel testing probability and statistics in the context of theory is pointless. The new integrated reasoning section will be testing these same concepts but in a much more relevant context. It’s actually more realistic and that’s why they’re doing it.

Q: How does Integrated Reasoning affect your 800 score?

GMAT Pill: It doesn’t. You actually get a completely separate score for it – similar to the way you get a separate AWA score.

So your score transcript will show your 800 score, your AWA score, and your IR score.

You can read more about Integrated Reasoning scoring here.

Q: Will there be a calculator for the integrated reasoning section?

GMATPill: Yes. Unlike the quant section of the existing GMAT section, the integrated reasoning section will involve “weird” math.
I say weird, because you’ll be using a lot more realistic numbers. Rather than seeing nice round numbers, or nice decimals, you’l actually see things like

.738 billion

And you might have to divide that by 1.25%

On the regular Quant section, you wouldn’t see weird numbers like this. But the purpose of the IR section is to be more “real-world” realistic in terms of the numbers you’d actually use in business and in business school. So yes, you’ll see these kinds of numbers and may very well need to use the on-screen calculator.

Q: How much longer will the exam be?

Actually it’s going to be the same amount of time. But it’s going to take the place of the 2nd AWA essay. So total time of the exam is still the same. However, it’s going to be a lot more grueling because the amount of thinking involved to sort data, do calculatins, and think critically on the IR section will be a lot more than the amount of thinking that you would have done for just a simple essay.

GMATPill has created solutions to sample Integrated Reasoning questions from GMAC for their new GMAT exam.


Watch New GMAT Integrated Reasoning Video Solutions

There are 4 types of Integrated Reasoning Questions

12 IR questions will be auto-generated for the exam. The approximate types of questions you’ll see (again, depending on how the algorithm calculates and the level of difficulty of questions selected) will be ~4 Two-Part Analysis, ~3 Graphics Interpretation, ~2 Table Analysis, and ~3 Multisource Reasoning questions.

Type #1: Graphics Interpretation – Here you’re given some kind of graph. It could be a bar chart, an XY scatter plot graph, or pie graph, or a Venn diagram. Your job is to interpret the graph and answer the question.

Now of the 12 integrated reasoning questions you get in the 30 minutes, ~3 of those 12 will be graphical interpretation questions. Each of those 3 questions will be formatted in the same way.

You’ll be given a diagram/graphic and your question will be formatted in the form of a drop down question. There will be two (2) statements and each statement will have a dropdown where you will have to select the appropriate option that best fills in that sentence.

Here’s what it looks like:

Type #2: Two-Part Analysis – This usually asks you two questions that both have the same selection pool of available answer choices. The first question is in the first column and the second question is in the second column.

Out of the 12 integrated reasoning questions you ‘ll see in those 30 minutes you get for this section, ~4 of them will be two part analysis questions. That’s the most out of these ~4 types of questions. All four of these two-part analysis questions will ask you to choose 1 answer for each of the 2 COLUMNS.

It looks like this:

Note this “two-part” format differs from the confusingly similar “this/that” question format, which you’l find in the Table Analysis and Multi-Source questions described below.

Type #3: Table Analysis – This involves interpreting a table of information. You might have a rows of data with a number of columns. You will have the ability to sort columns to help you sort through the pile of data. You will be asked a true or false question and you must answer yes or no for this integrated reasoning question.

Of the 12 integrated reasoning questions you’ll see, ~2 of them will be table analysis questions. Both of these ~2 questions will be in the “this/that” question format. Your job will be to choose Yes/No or True/False for each of the answer choices provided. Most of the time, you will see ~3 rows of answer choices – so you will need to pick 3 answers corresponding to the 2 options for each of those 3 answers. Here’s what it looks like:

Note the “This/That” format is similar but not the same as the “two-part” format mentioned above for the Two Part Analysis questions. Don’t worry, you’ll get the hang of it through the GMAT Pill videos.
Type #4: Multi-Source Reasoning – This one involves multiple tabs of information. Usually the first question will correspond with the first tab and the second question will correspond with the second tab and so on. All tabs will be related in some way.

Of the 12 integrated reasoning questions that you get 30 minutes to do, ~3 of them will be multi-source questions (MSR for short). ~2 of the 3 questions will be formatted in the “This/That” format that we talked about earlier in the Table Analysis section.

Again, here’s what it looks like:
And the remaining ~1 question will be in the traditional multiple choice format.

———————————–

Some additional points to note about the GMAT Integrated Reasononing section

1) So those are the 12 questions broken down into the 4 types of questions. You’ll have 30 minutes to complete – that’s an average of 2 minutes and 30 seconds per question.

2) Note the integrated reasoning section will be near the BEGINNING of your exam — right after the 1st essay, but before the Quant and Verbal sections which are responsible for your overall 800 score.

3) You cannot go backwards on the test.

4) The order in which you see the different types of question types is completely random. That means you might sometimes get a two-part analysis question first. Sometimes you might see multi-source, etc.. Don’t try to guess which question type you’ll get first. But do note that ~4 of the 12 integrated reasoning questions will be two-part analysis questions – so expect to see them more often.

5) In terms of scoring, the number of correct responses that count (meaning we exclude the 2-4 experimental questions) out of total # of questions that count will be scaled to get your raw score out of 8. The scaling factor will be based on 1) # of questions you received that actually count and 2) total difficulty level of all questions you received. So, it’s not as simple as “getting 8/12 questions correct translates to an IR score of 6”. Another person taking the exam can get 8 correct and get an IR score of 7. Click here for more details and examples on integrated reasoning scoring.

6) In the 30 minutes you get for the 12 questions, there is no partial credit. Budget 2 minutes and 30 seconds on average for each question. Note each “question” actually consists of 2-3 mini questions. There is NO partial credit for those mini questions.

You can read more about integrated reasoning scoring here.

For more information, check out GMATPill’s solution to the New GMAT Integrated Reasoning Questions released by GMAC.

Some of you may have heard about new changes in the Sentence Correction (SC) section related to idioms phasing out and a greater focus on meaning. You can read more about this development and what it means for your GMAT preparation needs here.

Just take a look at the video below. Notice there are data sets categorizing data in terms of country, % change, Rank, etc, in the context of airport data.

More info from the GMAC folks directly.
What does the GMAT prep market look like?

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