LOGIN

GMAT Sentence Correction Confusion is Cleared Up with Framework ApproachGMAT Sentence Correction Confusion is Cleared Up with Framework ApproachGMAT Sentence Correction Confusion is Cleared Up with Framework Approach

Hi Zeke,

#1. For your SC framework on consistency [x] and [y], for complex sentences like the following, how do you determine what things are supposed to be parallel?

Recent findings lend strong support to the theory that a black hole lies at the center of the Milky Way and of many of the 100 billion other galaxies estimate to exist in the universe.

Here you mention that “of the Milky Way” and “of the many of the 100 billion” are parallel

However, how do you know whether it is not supposed to be “at the center of the Milky Way” and “of many of the 100 billion other galaxies”

Attack GMAT Sentence Correction with X&Y Consistency / Parallelism

Let’s try it: “theory that a black hole lies (at the center of the Milky way) and (of many of the 100 billion other galaxies) ”

The first part makes sense: “Theory that a black hole lies at the center of the Milky way”
The second does not: “Theory that a black hole lies of many of the 100 billion other galaxies”

So essentially, it’s because of the word “of” in “of many of the 100 billion other galaxies”

“theory that a black hole lies OF many of the 100..” – does not make sense.

It makes more sense to have “at the center of X and [at the center] of Y” – do you see that?

OR

“that a black hole lies…..”.and “THAT many of the 100 billion other galaxies….”

It makes sense only after looking at the correct answer that the author intended to make “of the Milky Way” and “of the many of the 100 billion” to be parallel. But how do you know this is supposed to be the case?

What are some clues in the sentence / how do you identify which of the 3 groupings mentioned above is the “right” grouping for that sentence?

#2. For the sentence. “The defects in the structure of the Statue of Liberty which led to its deterioration…”

there is no comma between Liberty and which, does which still refer back to the Statue of Liberty or could it refer back to the whole phrase “defects in the structure of the S of Liberty”.

Examine Meaning for GMAT Sentence Correction Questions

Here you need to look at the meaning.
“which led to its deterioration”

Clearly, it’s “the defects” which “led to its deterioration. The Statue of Liberty cannot just lead to its deterioration – it’s gotta be something bad like “defects.”

What does “its” refer to? how do you determine whether it refers to the Statue of Liberty or the structure?

The “its” refers to the closest thing preceding the word – in this case “Statue of Liberty” – you can reference the signup for the SC Pill.

Thanks!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

GMATTM is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission CouncilTM . The Graduate Management Admission CouncilTM does not endorse, nor is it affiliated in any way with the owner or any content of this web site.
© Copyright 2014, All rights reserved.